FrouFrou 4 YouYou

Chicago Service Club Luncheon Raymond Hudd May 12, 2012

Once again, Sherry Lea Holson, the chairman of the event, has brought millinery back on the mind and on the heads of Chicago’s most fashionable women, at the annual Mad Hatters Luncheon on May 10,  2012, in Chicago, Illinois.Sherry Lea Holson with milliner, Jenny Pfanensteil of Forme` Millinery

This photo shows Sherry with  Jenny Pfanensteil of Forme` Millinery, the speaker on the life and work of Raymond Hudd. The lunch was over, some guests have departed, and both are still smiling. In other photos you may see Sherry at the podium making announcements of winners in contest categories, wearing a black velvet Raymond Hudd hat with fluttering feathers, but here she models an original design by Jenny.

The sign that graced the last store of Raymond Hudd at 2545 N. Clark St, in Chicago, at the entry to the exhibit of his hats held before the luncheon.

An “Egg” hat designed by Raymond is displayed on a hat box that shows his logo of a wide brim hat. This hat was lent by Eia, a well regarded Chicago milliner and friend of Raymond’s. Eia created the Raymond Hudd Millinery Award in his honor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. This hat is destined to the School’s fashion collection, where aspiring milliners can hatch their own hat designs.

Top photo of three bright straws, in yellow with iris, orange with flowers, and red with poppies are from the collection of Iris Sholder, a friend of Raymond’s, hat collector and wearer. Atop that group is an alligator hat, headed for a future fundraiser for the Raymond Hudd Award. Bottom photo of alligator hat from above.

Three teddy bear hats were on display, the top left catching the edge of the green brim hat, the center black satin, and right corner black edged with bears hat.

In the center is a black hat covered in feathers, and sprouting a fountain of feathers in the center, destined to the School of the Art Institute. On the left is a light straw with wide brim, gold lame trim and unique ribbon work.  Lower center is the teal and black feather with the oldest label of Raymond’s, part of the collection of Mary Robak, blogger, milliner wannabe, Chicago millinery historian.

Cheryl Bollinger is wearing a hat that makes a tall feather statement. A perfect match to her top, it was designed again by her favorite florist in Paw Paw, MI,  Sherri Taylor owner of Taylor’s Florist. Last year that florist created Cheryl’s award winning hat to match her dress. This is only the florist’s second hat. Now that is talent and Cheryl has found a fine milliner, even if she herself has not come to that conclusion.

The moment you look at this Anthropology top, you know the hat was meant for it. This creative attendee, Tammy Beeler, made the hat herself, I believe her first. It was memorable enough that the judges selected it a winner this year.

Hazel Barr in her award winning Raymond Hudd hat, from her extensive personal collection.

At the end of the exhibit there was another room for dining, with a lighthearted elegant feel to the room.

The flowers were arranged to appear to be a handbag, an essential accessory to the HAT! The flowers were done by Lord and Mar of Lake Forest.

Table favors of notepad and pen atop a sovenier booklet created just for this luncheon. It features a black and white image of the painting created for the luncheon by  Inside are pages of photos of hats from an issue of Pulp, Winter 1988, story by Janet Moredock, with portrait by Francisco Caseres, and fashion photos by J. B. Spector with some of the most unique Raymond Hudd hats. The Headliner Series. There was one new article each year that Raymond selected as inspiration which was revealed in his shop window on New Years Day. Some reflected the Rebellion in the Philippines, with a flower encrusted shoe on top of the hat (rather reminiscent of a  Schiaparelli shoe hat), Spam Turns 50, and the Tylenol Maker Scraps Capsules, which are in the Chicago History Museums costume collection.

Moments before the drawing of a gift card from Ralph Lauren, this couple, Karen and Jeff Morris, from Minneapolis were enjoying the event. She is a milliner and is wearing her own creation.  She was most excited when she won the gift card, as she shall now be returning to Chicago to use it.

Sherry Lea Holson is standing at the podium flanked by Bill Zwecker, who with Robin Robinson, and Elizabeth Hamel were judges of several hat categories.

Seated at the table with a friend, is one of the award winners in a long black veil topped top hat. Her prize was the coveted hat donated by the speaker, Jenny of Forme` Millinery. Below are photos of that hat before the event began. It looked stunning on, and is certain to be admired by many.

This attendee is delighted as she approaches the podium to accept her new hat as the winner in the best ensemble category.

Lots of fun, food and fashion. Raymond Hudd would have been so pleased.

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Chicago Millinery History: The Raymond Hudd Awards for School of the Art Insitute of Chicago May 5, 2012

The awards to the millinery students of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago were held on Wednesday, May 2, 2012. The Wenzeler Gallery was a most unique location, but perfect as the gears this company manufactures were the inspirations for the hats.

A large group of students, family, faculty and university staff, as well as interested hat lovers attended the opening reception for the dozens of items on display through June, 2012.

The photo just above shows the line of demarcation for the gallery from the plant. Two worlds that seem dissimilar, yet when one is standing among the high tech and the high fashion it is a good combination. Mr. Wenzeler is the moving force for this gallery in his company headquarters and plant. The gears are created with incredible precision as well as creativity, and are found in many of the cars we drive. His appreciation for the arts brought him to offer this venue and unique inspirational experience for the students. It is no small matter that his life is graced by a wife with excellent fashion sense, and a delightful hostess as well.

The hats that follow are only shown from one view, but each is a three dimensional creation to allow your eye a chance to recognize their relationship to the gears that serve as the jumping off point in the design process.

It was hard to determine which hat would win the several awards presented, which included the Raymond Hudd, the Dean’s award, who choses one for her own collection, and a mystery person’s donation for awards, and the generous scholarship awards of the gracious host, Mr. Wenzeler.

Some attendees are seen enjoying the festive atmosphere, and also the official photographer whose use of a ladder was essential to get the best angles. Tho he offered this amatuer the use of the ladder, it is best those shots are left to the professionals.

Click here if you want to know the News coverage by the Sun-Times   There is also a photo gallery to click on within the article, and another here: http://pioneerlocal.mycapture.com/mycapture/folder.asp?event=1464922&CategoryID=2144&ListSubAlbums=0

 

What hat did this attendee wear? A Raymond Hudd, of course. A small gold lame with black feathers. It was great fun to show it to two of the students who graciously allowed their photos to be taken. Perhaps a few decades from now someone else will wear a vintage hat they created to another award ceremony with an award granted in their name. It is entirely possible, as Raymond himself started his art education in 1948 in this very school, before he opened his first shop in 1950.

Photos of the winners, you ask? No. The camera froze, which tho frustrating in the moment, allowed total attention to the event as the awards were presented. All were winners that evening, and will be on the forefront of design for decades to come.

 

Ooh-La-La:Yes, that is a Hat Shop! May 2, 2012

The wonderful world of millinery is doing just fine in Highland Park, IL. That is a suburb a bit north of Chicago, and well worth many tanks of gas, if you have the inclination to indulge in some finery.

Lisa Farrell began in 1991, and studied with the venerable Veronica Chin of Chicago. Somewhere along the way an article about Lisa caught the attention of a north shore woman with a connection to a millinery in St. Louis. One with 400 wood blocks in all manner of styles. Those grace the shelves of one tall wall in the store; what visual impact. Photos on her website show that impact and the song tells the story of the name of the shop. This is the first millinery shop site with a theme song!

http://parishats.com/about.html

The hats tho take precedence over the blocks. One is nicer than the next, to the point that you wonder if Lisa ever has a moment when she is not creating. The visit to her shop caught her in the midst of finishing some last minute orders for the Derby next weekend. That was not the time to deter her from completing some interesting creations, sure to please the attendees. Other hats in the shop were by Veronica Chin of Burning Bush, and there were also some knit childrens’ items from a woman in CA.

As a customer entered with a little boy in tow, it seemed wise to depart until a later time when visiting is better. The chances of finding a perfect hat with a youngster present are challenging at best, so every moment needed to be spent with her. Perhaps, she too will find the right hat and attend the Derby as well. Just in case one is too late for custom design, many in the shop were showstoppers. One especially oversized with long black feather plums, and an aqua flower larger than nature creates, could have been the perfect hat for her. At $500 it was well priced, as many derby hats are known to be sold for at least double that amount.

If you are nearby do stop in at 441 Central, or catch her creations at the  Millinery Arts Alliance events at the Peninsula Hotel in Chicago. That group of milliners create many irresistible temptations. For more info look over their site as well. http://millineryartsalliance.com/