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Chicago Fashion and Millinery History: The Chicagoan Magazine Part IV Fashion Advertising April 25, 2018

Fashion ads were plentiful in The Chicagoan. The first issue, June 1926 featured ads from the one high end fashion store, McAvoy, at 615 N. Michigan Ave. There was a 1/6 page ad for The Sports Shop of Lake Forest, with one shop at 633N. Michigan Ave, and another at Market Square in Lake Forest. Many of the intended readership had summer homes in Lake Forest, or along Lake Michigan, to escape the heat of the city. The back cover was devoted to CD Peacock for jewels. They had been in operation since 1837, when the city was first incorporated.  https://cdpeacock.com/the-history-of-c-d-peacock/

 

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

The following issue had those same advertisers, as well as Hartmann luggage, the Louis Vuitton of it’s day.

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

Perfume appears in the third issue, as well as Pearlie Powell on Michigan Ave, south of the bridge. The ads from Toujours Moi were repeated at times, all with a similar look.

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

The Nov. 15, 1926 issue has a a very informative ad from Pearlie Powell, with many top notch French designers in stock. They were certainly well enough established to be able to buy from so many leading designers while in Paris.

 

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

The available issues for 1927 start with July, but the only fashion ad was from Pearlie Powell. Perhaps others felt with so many readers on vacation this was not the time to spend on advertising. The last issue of July has one fur ad, Berman Furs, but then no fashion ads until Sept 24, when F.A. Arendt Importers from 171 N. Michigan Ave ran the first of two ads.

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

1928 is off to a start with the Jan 28 issue including an ad from Seidler Imports at 6N Michigan Ave, which they continued to include into at least 1929.

http://chicagoan.lib.uchicago.edu/xtf/view?docId=bookreader/mvol-0010-v004-i09/mvol-0010-v004-i09.xml;query=1926;brand=default#page/8/mode/1up

 

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

The first Saks Fifth Avenue ad for their NY store appears  Aug 8, 1928, and they continue periodically until, and beyond when they can announce their Chicago opening in 1931. Sept 22 reveals a Marshall Field ad for the new line, Marfield. It tells us each month in the first week they will be featuring exciting new stock.

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

Charles Stevens gets on the bandwagon in December 29, 1928. This was a banner issue for fashion ads, since it included Saks Fifth Avenue, McAvoy, Seidler , and among the newcomers: June Modjeska Shop at 616 Rush, Sonia at 416S. Michigan, Dobbs hats at Dockstader and Sandberg at 900 N. Michigan Ave. The issue came out earlier than the publication date, providing readers with gift giving ideas.

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

Martha Wethered was a store in the Drake Hotel and another across the street on the west side at the corner of Oak. They placed their first ad 10/2/1929, just before the stock market crash which created issues for rich and poor alike. Altho Martha’s stores survived the Depression, and endured a total fire loss, they ended up owned by Bramson, which also eventually went out of business many decades later.

One wonders how the advertising sales person for this magazine felt when thinking of the other fashion advertisers that issue. Those included Charles Stevens, Saks Fifth Ave, Blum’s Vogue, and other ad newcomers Betty Wales,

 

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

This seems like a good place to pause. Perhaps another couple of dozen ads will be added to this post at a later time. In the meantime, please indulge yourself in a feast of Art Deco with the online issues: http://chicagoan.lib.uchicago.edu/xtf/search?keyword=1926

 

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Chicago Fashion and Millinery History: The Chicagoan Magazine Part II- The Target Audience: The Wealthy April 23, 2018

This magazine was aimed at the wealthy and the hope to be wealthy Chicagoans.

Ten questions are posed by Arthur Meeker  Feb 25. 1928 to determine where or IF one could be among the social elite Chicago 400. Those rarefied individuals are those with money, likely old money, power and presence. One question, #4 pertains to women. “Do you own a shop? ” Highly desired if on the Gold Coast, and it must be “just for the fun of it.”

http://chicagoan.lib.uchicago.edu/xtf/view?docId=bookreader/mvol-0010-v004-i11/mvol-0010-v004-i11.xml;query=1928;brand=default#page/1/mode/1up

 

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

Six months before the stock market crash there was one article of interest to women. The magazine did regular articles on the elite clubs to which Chicagoans belonged. For the most part they were for men.

Women had the Chicago Women’s Club from 1876 to 1999 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_Woman%27s_Club; The Fornightly Club, still in existence; and The Service Club of Chicago, still in existence since 1890.https://theserviceclubofchicago.org/

If any of these were covered in an article they remain to be found. The one which was covered was the Women’s Athletic Club. http://www.wacchicago.com/, which is still in existence. It’s move to the Michigan Ave location in 1929 warranted attention.
On April 13, 1929 Helen S. Young dissected this club. Lest you imagine this as a fitness operation, hold that thought. There was a swimming pool, but also massages and primarily fine dining. In 1929 it had a $4,000 membership fee. In 2017 that would be GREATER THAN $57,000. Of most interest is that there was a 400 person wait list, which meant waiting till a member died. This new location, with a ballroom for debutante balls might mean some nonmembers could get a glimpse when invited to some festivities.

Debutante events were mentioned with regularity in The Chicagoan. Early reporting for this publication was in the Sept 15, 1926, issue featuring Ellen Borden, Glee Louise Viles, Chauncy McCormick’s niece, Noel Stone of Baltimore, Katherine Thorne, and Dorothy Rend.

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

Another sign of wealth was an automobile or even two. Sometimes they were referred to as limousines, and there were hired limo drivers as a dedicated employee of a household. In 1926 a The Chicagoan article was entitled “The First 100 Limousines.” It provided insight into the the first 100 license plate holders in IL. The Packard was the most popular auto. Seventeen auto plates were held by women in IL, fourteen of them in Chicago. Two women had two cars each. Mrs. F. W. Upham had two Lincolns, and Mrs Florence G. Lowden had two Packards. The remaining women had 11 Cadillacs, a Pierce Arrow, a Peerless, a Nash, and a Paige.

In 1900 there were only 10,000 cars in the world, but by 1910 there were 130,000 cars, 35,000 trucks and 150,000 motorcycles. The first state to require registration was New York in 1901. In 1901 in IL there were no plates, only a pin worn on apparel of the driver. All states required licensing by 1918.

Applications for plates were due by Dec 10, but a person could request the same number. #1 was held by Mr. Sidney Gorham of LaGrange, the author of the IL license law.

On to the first issue of the last year of issue, Jan. 1935. Who knows if they already suspected April would be the last issue or not. The Depression had been an problem since 1929. Thank heavens for the repeal of prohibition in Dec, 1933. Now at least one could drink their troubles away publicly, tho the wealthy did a fine job of it even during Prohibition.

In the 1934 first issue of the year available there were ads for alcohol. Over 80 total pages in the Feb 1 issue and there were eight full page alcohol ads and four partial page ads.  In this 1935 issue of 52 pages there were eight partial page ads, plus the only full page, from Martini and Rossi vermouth. There was a serious loss of advertising dollars over the year.

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

 

The Table of Contents was not included in the first few years of the publication. In some earlier issues the Table of Contents covered an entire page. There are plenty of page number problems if one were to devote time to looking for them. Sometimes there were author credits with the title and not with the article. Spelling is a skill, and a variety of versions of a name appear.

 

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

 

What were the wealthy to wear to the favored destinations of Miami, and Hawaii?Advise is given over several pages of the destinations. A two page illustrated article told what to wear, but neither the index nor article indicated who was advising on these lovelies.

Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

Where did the issues of this magazine find other advertisers? What else were the readers to desire in products and service? A tip of that melting iceberg of ads ran for beauty giants Dorothy Gray, Helena Rubenstein at 670 N. Michigan Ave, and Elizabeth Arden at 70 E. Walton. Many perfumes were popular, including Guerlain Parfume.

Popular restaurants abounded, even outside the Gold Coast. Travel destinations blossomed from international to regional, such as Dell View Hotel at Lake Delton, WI, at $5 per day, including meals. Be sure to pack your things in your Hartmann bags, as they had advertised from the very first issue.

 

 

 

Chicago Fashion and Millinery History: The Chicagoan Magazine Part I – The Book, The Magazine

The Book

book cover

In 2008 Neil Harris wrote The Chicagoan: A Lost Magazine of the Jazz Age. The first source of information for this blog series on the magazine came from this book. It is a highly enjoyable read about the magazine, and has excellent visuals of covers and copied pages. http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/C/bo5896615.html

Mr. Harris started his journey finding bound copies of perhaps the majority of issues in the University of Chicago Regenstein Library. The original issues were donated by an alumni, Julia Fay Hecker.

One aspect of the magazine not fully explored by Mr. Harris is the male vs female preponderance of writers. When it comes to fashion, one might think female writers would be the expected population. It was, but there are times when some were not likely given the credit as were the male counterparts. One process for authorship was to refer to the writers of fashion as The Chicagoenne. More than once the fashion column had that name, and later the authorship was such. There was an indication the Chicagoenne could have been a group of at least three, basically anonymous, authors.

Mr. Harris does give acknowledgement to writers early in the book, and paragraphs in an appendix section, Contributor’s Biographies. In the early pages mention is made of staff Susan Wilber, Irene Castle McLaughlin (yes, the dancing star of the era), Alicia Patterson, Dorothy Aldis, Vera Caspary, Janet Ayer Fairbanks, Mrs. John Borden, Lucia Lewis, and “sometimes editor” Ruth G. Bergman. 1. In the Appendix section seventy three men were listed, and eleven women were listed. 73 vs 11, hmm. Of those eleven several were not in the original early page group: Marie Armstong Hecht (Mrs. Ben Hecht, for those who care that her husband had fame), who was the first editor. Jolly good, a woman had a key position. The other additional women authors from the Appendix include Genevive Forbes Herrick, Elsie Seeds, Herminia and Irma Selz, and Ethel Spears.

While reviewing each fashion article of all the issues available, there are some additional names to be found when one gets to the last part, Part V of this blog series. If you look at the Index, Ms. Wilbur had the most pages mentioned with a total of seven. (Does Dear Reader sense there is a feminist slant to this blog series? YES, this whole FF4YY blog has been aimed at millinery history, a feminine fashion topic, and particularly the women who contributed to the industry.)

The magazine costs were likely significant as this was a classy high grade paper publication. Issued twice a month initially, for a few years, it fell to a monthly in 1931. Some gaps were acknowledged, but it is hard to pinpoint without the full collection in the library. “But subscription fees fell quickly from the ambitious five dollar annual to 1931 to three dollars and finally two.” “The April 1935 issue, down to 50 pages, turned out to be the final gasp.” “No warning, no announcement.” 2.

Although one might think it highly risky for another publication to come out during the Depression, Esquire had an impact. Esquire premiered “October, 15, 1933 and sold out at 105,00 copies, the second issue at 400,000.” 3. Overall The Chicagoan only had 5,900 copies sold.

The Chicago World Fair, also known as the Century of Progress in 1933-1934 had excellent coverage in The Chicagoan, and likely carried it through longer than perhaps it would have lasted otherwise. But without the Fair and the new Esquire favored by men, who likely paid for most of the subscriptions, subscriptions dwindled. There were just not enough wealthy people around to carry this magazine further.

The Magazine

Fortunately the library website has digital copies. Although not every issue is present, it is a most impressive collection. http://chicagoan.lib.uchicago.edu/xtf/search?static=home

The Chicagoan, published from 1926 to 1935 in Chicago, was explicitly modeled on the New Yorker in both its graphic design and editorial content. The magazine aimed to portray the city as a cultural hub and counter its image as a place of violence and vice. It was first issued biweekly and then, in a larger format, monthly, ceasing publication in the midst of the Depression.

Along the course of this five part blog you will find many links. Just reading the posts without perusing the digital copies would be unfortunate. You can get Art Deco images and the wider variety of content beyond fashion mentioned in these blogs.

Background on the book and magazine, The Chicagoan, this post, Part I.

The Target Audience: The Wealthy in The Chicagoan Part II

Fashion Columns in The Chicagoan Part III

Fashion Advertising in The Chicagoan Part IV

Above photo: Copyright The Quigley Publishing Company, a Division of QP Media, Inc.

 

Female Authors of The Chicagoan Part V Although this topic seems a little removed from the actual world of fashion, these women impacted fashion just as much as a movie or food critic. When Part V will appear remains unclear, as the research has only just started. Perhaps most will have disappeared from history and little will be found, but hopefully enough to make the topic of interest. Now if only I could find photos of them wearing hats, to gain a little insight into their own wardrobes.

IS there a chance this magazine could appear again? A valiant attempt was made by J.C. Gabel in 2012, but has not come to a point one can relive the glory years.

https://www.timeout.com/chicago/things-to-do/the-chicagoan-online-archive-see-every-cover-of-chicagos-new-yorker

 

 

1. Neil Harris, with the assistance of Teri J. Edelstein, The Chicagoan:A Lost Magazine of the Jazz Age (The University of Chicago Press,  2008),   13-15.

2. Neil Harris, with the assistance of Teri J. Edelstein, The Chicagoan:A Lost Magazine of the Jazz Age,  24-25.

3. Neil Harris, with the assistance of Teri J. Edelstein, The Chicagoan:A Lost Magazine of the Jazz Age,  26.

 

 

 



 

Chicago Millinery History: Martha Rahl March 11, 2017

pullmanbldg2

Martha Rahl had quite the location for her millinery establishment at 202 S. Michigan Ave, the Pullman Building, seen above, at the corner of Michigan and Adams. This is the west side of the street, across from the Art Institute of Chicago. The block west of Michigan was Wabash, and on that entire block north of Adams were the millinery meccas of Gage Hat and Edson Keith, primarily wholesalers. It was an excellent location, her last location.

downtown street building drawing of lots

Looking at the drawing of the Pullman Building in block 5, https://chicagology.com/goldenage/goldenage067/, one sees the western half of the block north, block 4, with the Palmer House across from it. The Pullman building had been built in 1893, by the Pullmans who built rail cars, with two other mega buildings south of the downtown area. They put their executives in offices of this ten story building, and included the first floor of shops. At the time of this map it shows the south edge of the Pullman building butting the Palmer House stables,(Red arrow), probably an unpleasantly fragrant place. By the time Martha had her shop in the Pullman Building the stables had been replaced in 1904 by the Chicago Orchestra Hall, now known as Symphony Center. The other shops in the Pullman building in 1926 included linens, gloves and corsets, books, cigars, the Tip Top Café, and best of all, Fannie May Candy.

Fannie May candy has been around since their first shop in 1920 at 11 N. LaSalle, north of the financial district, several blocks west of Michigan Ave. By the time we find Martha’s shop listed in a directory in 1923, Fannie May had 22 shops, making their $.70/lb candy quite the draw for anyone near the building. That foot traffic could only have augmented the foot traffic into Martha’s shop as well.

Backtracking to the earlier years for Martha and we find her listed in a directory for Houston, TX in 1900, as a trimmer at Miss Katie G. Welch, located at 615 Main St, and rooming at 818 Main St. Katie also roomed at the same location.

Sometime after that she came to Chicago, as the first ad we find is in 1905.The shop was at 30 N. Michigan and remained there till she moved a block away, sometime after 1917.

Martha does not appear in the 1900 Polk directory, the 1904, 1906, 1910 Blue Book, nor oddly the 1910 directory, yet she advertised in the Blue Book back in 1905. The same ad appears in the 1915 issue of the Blue Book, so she did not give up on it entirely.She appears in a 1917 Directory still at 30 N. Michigan, suite 615.

The 1910 census has Martha, 26, as a milliner living as a lodger at 2018 Independence in Chicago. A residence address in 1923 is given for 4462 Woodlawn, and her occupation is listed as ladies ready to wear. http://www.chicagoancestors.org/sites/default/files/downloads/1923ra-re.pdf

ChicagoBB1915_0820

It seems likely Martha read thru the 1904 issue and looked at the millinery competition, thinking she could do well in reaching out to the biggest spenders. Maison Novelle ran a full page ad just inside the cover. The ten milliners with ads were scattered around the city. None had shops on Michigan Ave, tho two had locations in the Masonic Temple. Many other shops existed, they just did not advertise in the Blue Book.

The Masonic Temple was built in 1892, and was considered the tallest building in Chicago from 1895-1899 at twelve stories. It’s location on the northeast corner of Randolph and State is now a Walgreens, across from Macy’s store, the former Marshall Field store.

Chicago_Masonic_Temple_Building

The two milliners from the Masonic Temple were Mrs. Marguerite Prucka on the fifth floor, and Madam Hunt on the twelfth floor. Madam Hunt’s ad also included her title as President of the National Milliners Association.

Hats were sold in department stores, apparel shops and millinery shops. Knowing who your overall competition is remains a fundamental aspect of successful marketing, especially in the immediate vicinity, including apparel stores and department stores.
Two of the big players nearby in the high end fashion apparel stores would be Blum’s and Leschin.

Blum’s Vogue

624 S. Michigan Avenue was built in 1908 for the Chicago Musical College,  headed by Florenz Ziegfield Sr. Mr. Ziegfeld was the father of the Broadway Follies producer Flo Ziegfield, Jr. Topping off at 15 floors  in 1922 they had the building renamed the Blum Building.

Leschin

318 Michigan Ave South.
In 1916 Jack Leschin, who had handled the millinery department for the now defunct Ferguson Dept store, opened in the old Ferguson location. Capitalized at $100,000 he partnered with several who had been associated with Bonwit Teller in NYC.
In 1921 “Samuel Leschin, milliner” leased space for 10 years fronting State St at Jackson for millinery. Is this a relative of Jack’s?

An ad from Leschin on March 4, 1925 features a lace and taffeta dress for $75. That is a high end dress, $933.37 in 2017 dollars.
Oct 8 1929 full page ad features Leschin designs, including draped on the head hats for $18.50. Since the Stock Market Crash of 1929 started Oct 24, one wonders how many shoppers regretted some of their expensive fashion investments. The Depression impacted all retail, but Leschin weathered things well enough to move to classier digs in 1931.

Department stores two blocks to the west of Michigan Ave, on State Street, drew a high concentration of shoppers.

Perhaps Martha had the time to read the Sunday Tribune newspaper on March 1, 1925. That year Easter was April 12, so the last minute rush was not upon her just yet.
To look at the ads for millinery from her closest competitors, one finds a variety of price point items. Mid-priced and lower priced millinery could be found at $5 for Felts at Mandels, Hillmans, with a 26th Anniversary Sale, of 5000 hats at $4.45, and Sears, Roebuck and Co. at $3.45-$3.85.
mar 2 1925 fields ad
Since Marshall Field and Co. did not advertise on Sunday, one would need to wait for the full page fashion ad of Monday, March 2, 1925. The drawing in the center of the page shows the narrow lines of the dresses, and the cloche hats. It was Spring Opening that day, with plenty of loyal customers headed downtown to make their selection. The paragraph on the right side of the print section advises the reader to select a “Wee Sleekit Beastie” rhinestone pin of horses, owls, elephants, dogs, peacocks and lions for $1.50, as they “are quite correct for Spring bonnets.”

carsons ad mar 2 1925

Carson Pirie Scott and Co featured some hats at $15 in their ad.

mar 1 1925 fashion article
One of the fashion articles March 1 indicated the silhouette had not really changed, and an ad for the high end Johnson & Harwood completed the other half of the page. Three pages filled with the women of society and club activities would have caught Martha’s attention, as her clientele were likely to include some society ladies. Keep in mind the Blue Book ad twenty years before which Martha ran in 1905, and in 1915, had her hats costing $10-$150.

Directories for the city with the Pullman Building mention the Martha Rahl shop thru 1930. It makes one wonder if the Depression took it’s toll on the business.

Sadly tho, it seems the spring fashion pages of 1925 were the last for Martha herself, as for unknown reasons she died on July 19, 1925. She had lived on the south side, and was buried at a south side cemetery, Oak Woods at 1035 East 67th Street.

Martha may have only lived 43 years, but she saw a lot of hats from Michigan to Houston to Chicago, having had one of the finest shops on Michigan Avenue.

Name: Martha Rahl
Birth Date: 30 Sep 1881
Birth Place: Battle Creek, Michigan
Death Date: 19 Jul 1925
Death Place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois
Burial Date: 21 Jul 1925
Cemetery Name: Oakwoods
Death Age: 43
Occupation: Manager – apparel shop
Race: White
Marital Status: S
Gender: Female
Residence: Chicago, Cook, Illinois
Father Name: Walter Rahl
Father Birth Place: Scarnton, Pennsylvania
Mother Birth Place: New York, New York
 

Chicago Millinery History: Marshall Field and Co. and Millinery Part 2 March 18, 2016

image

Marshall Filed and Co was cutting edge in the world of fashion. Millinery was no exception.

Hat selection was a fun tho perhaps time consuming process in the early years. Since there were so many choices a woman would be tempted by many, and in some situations, went home with more than one hat at a time.

Once the hat was selected, the transaction proceeded with cash or credit.

Cash or a check was a quick way to finalize a transaction. When the final “new” building at State and Washington was completed it made getting  your change a high tech event.”An extensive pneumatic-tube system, consisting of over 125,000 feet of tubing and 4,500 carriers, whisked customers’ money to the cashiering department where change was made and sent back to the originating sales counter.” http://web.archive.org/web/20110927065743/http://chicago.urban-history.org/ven/dss/fields.shtml

The Field’s approach to credit was very forward thinking early on in the history of the company. “It was the first store to offer revolving credit.” https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Field%27s

Who is to be credited with this credit approach is sometimes murky. Harry Gordon Selfridge was a leading man in the retail operation. “He greatly increased the store’s advertising budget, expanded its package delivery system, and established a bargain basement to broaden the store’s appeal among less wealthy Chicagoans. He also promised customers complete satisfaction, offering easy credit, the right to return merchandise for a full refund, and numerous in-store amenities such as a personal shopping service and ladies’ tearoom, one of the first of its kind in the nation.” http://web.archive.org/web/20110927065743/http://chicago.urban-history.org/ven/dss/fields.shtml

Credit cards, or charge cards as they could be called, were issued by the store. There was also another approach locally. The Chicago Credit Plate Service, Inc. These Charga cards were a cardboard form slid into the metal embossed on the back frame. The cards were placed into a machine to run over the embossed part with carbon paper between the multi-layer form to transfer the owner info on the receipts.

This credit card was one where a customer could make purchases at several downtown stores, Marshall Field and Co, Mandel Bros, The Fair, Carson, Pirie, Scott and Co, and  Charles A. Stevens. http://www.ebay.com/itm/VINTAGE-METAL-CHARGE-CARD-CHICAGO-CREDIT-PLATE-SERVICE-MARSHALL-FIELD-CO-EUC-/141887202637?hash=item210922e54d:g:H2wAAOSwKtlWpn7y

image

Later on the credit card had a different look. For the gold Rewards card of the 1990s, housed at the Smithsonian, an explanation is provided. “This Marshall Field’s Regards credit card belonged to Ms. Joanne Klein during the 1990s. While a store-issued charge card was once a way to extend credit to reputable customers, by the 1990s they became an avenue for department stores to encourage repeat shoppers and store loyalty by providing perks through store credit cards. For instance, Marshall Field’s Regards card granted the holder a free cup of coffee at the stores’ coffee bar. Store issued cards also gave the store insight into the consumer’s purchasing patterns and shopping behavior.”http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_1450048

image

One in the corporate color of green was a late issue:

image

Marshall Field and Co did not entirely endorse just using credit. They had banks that looked like earlier cards to save money. (Money one might imagine they hoped you would bring back to the store and spend there.)

image

Once the transaction was complete the hat went into a hat box. The most often found ones,on the market these days, are round tan/grey wood-look boxes. Some have a same paper as of the box gummed Fields name label. The gummed backing does not stay on well anymore.

image

If you need one of these boxes, here is one on Etsy:

https://www.etsy.com/listing/244080310/50-off-easter-sale-vintage-marshall?ref=shop_home_active_9&ga_search_query=Hat%2Bbox

They have a twisted cord handle, far better than later boxes with a string handle. The green shallow lid square boxes did not even have  a handle.  The oldest box is the one shown at the top of this blog. It is 18″round from the French Room, most likely back in the day when the big hat at a big price could be found in that most elite section of the store. The 28 Shop opened in  1941.

More info on the 28 Shop can be found in another post here, as well as on another blog, by Couture Allure:http://coutureallure.blogspot.com/2012/08/marshall-fields-28-shop.html

image

imageimage

This square hatbox is available with a hat from Fields by an Etsy seller, from Indiana. One wonders if the original owner made a trip to State Street to the Mecca of stores, Marshall Field and Co, or had the hat shipped.

https://www.etsy.com/listing/244080310/50-off-easter-sale-vintage-marshall?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=marshall%20field%20hat%20box&ref=sr_gallery_3

 

Chicago Millinery History: Marshall Field and Co, and Millinery Part 1 March 10, 2016

The store of greatest reknown in Chicago is definitely Marshall Field and Co. It’s history as a shopping Mecca for Chicagoans and many millions of visitors is told in many ways. There are magazine articles, newspaper articles, and books which have been written about the man, Marshall Field, as well as the store. There is an online entry for both on Wikipedia. There are postcards through the decades. There are U-Tube films, the best of which should not be missed. Rebecca V. Larkin does more for the image of the man and the store than any other media out there.

Fashion was a top focus for the store. As Marshall Field V tells Ms. Larkin in her interview of him, “The men made the money, and the women spent it.” http://www.pdxhistory.com/html/marshall_fields.html

Those women spent plenty of it on hats. One enjoyable way to look back in time is through the newspaper advertisements placed by Marshall Field and Co in the Chicago Tribune. The ads go back to 1871. The Chicago Tribune began in 1871.

The first spring following the Chicago Fire of 1871 has advertising in March to tempt people to shop. This March 1, 1872 front page ad collection has none from Marshall Fields in all of the entire 6 page issue. (For ease of reading look at bar on bottom of page for + sign to click to enlarge enough to read.)
http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1872/03/01/page/1/article/display-ad-1-no-title
John V. Farwell, a former partner of Marshall Field has his own enterprise, and he has an ad for his April 1 reopening at Monroe and Franklin.

image

Should one worry that Field’s store is not active? No, it has reopened in a barn that was renovated quickly just weeks after the fire. The news reports at that time indicated women were lined up around the block to get in. It may be that word of mouth, and reputation was good enough to have enough trade without advertising.

What the hat salespeople of Field’s might be concerned a bit about are two ads on March 3, 1872. On the front page Walsh and Hutchinson is making it known their wholesale house is operating, and will even provide hotel accommodations for the out of town buyers. Since so many structures burned with the fire, it seems lodging would have been at a prime.

image.

The other ad is even more concerning for millinery competition. On page 5 the ad shows the opening of the first millinery concern in the former burned area, 258 Wabash, at Jackson. Hewes and Prescott reestablished themselves, but it is not known for how long, as no other documentation of them shows up outside of newspaper ads. http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1872/03/03/page/5

The Field’s and Leiter store, as it was still a partnership of Marshall Field and L. Leiter back then, were advertising on March 4 about special fabric goods, so women could get on track to make some summer gowns. Love the part of the ad at the bottom where one could find Butterick patterns on the second floor. They were still at State and 22nd St, in the barn. http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1872/03/04/page/1

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By Mar 1, 1900 the Field’s ad was about 3/4 of a page in the 12 page newspaper. The big deal was the Silver Sale. Field’s had moved back to the Sate St location in 18__. What lady who went in search of silver would not have been tempted to look at hats as well?http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1900/03/01/page/7/article/display-ad-4-no-title

 

On March 5, tho, the ad was one entire back page. Lots of temptations again for any woman of means to create some dresses, and trim their own hats. Veilings, previously to $.85, were available for $.25/yd. The ribbon choices were extensive. Tho feathers were not mentioned, they certainly would have been in stock, too.http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1900/03/05/page/12/article/display-ad-5-no-title

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A decade later ads were still used, but even better is a drawing of what is being espoused as the latest, a green sailor hat:http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1910/03/01/page/10/article/health-and-beauty

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By 1920 the ads make note in a full page ad that Easter is approaching, and Fields has hats in five departments; French Salon, American Room, Sport Room, English Room, and Hat Shapes and Trimmings.

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Finding hats sold at Fields in the vintage market is not too difficult in the Chicago area. Here are some hats from several vintage sellers showing hats:

Frocks and Frills in Wheaton,IL also is online at Etsy:

Pink beaded hat by Amy

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Lilac floral hat by Marshall Field and Co.

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Black hat by Leslie James

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Straw hat by Mr. John

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Sweet Ginger Vintage in Mayfield, WI, and also online on Etsy:

Straw trilby hat by Marshal Field and Co

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FrouFrou4YouYou on Etsy:

Blue floral hat by Marshall Field & Co.

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Red satin hat by Lemington

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Black feather headband by Marshall Field and Co

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Frocks and Frills hats:

https://www.etsy.com/listing/169741860/on-sale-1950s-pink-sequins-hat-amy-for?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=marshall%20field&ref=sr_gallery_22

https://www.etsy.com/listing/267792272/on-sale-1960s-lilac-floral-hat-marshall?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=marshall%20field&ref=sr_gallery_7

https://www.etsy.com/listing/161224109/on-sale-1960s-black-straw-hat-leslie?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=marshall%20field&ref=sr_gallery_38

https://www.etsy.com/listing/238791047/on-sale-1950s-mr-john-straw-hat-taupe?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=marshall%20field&ref=sr_gallery_21

Sweet Ginger Vintage:
Straw trilby hat: https://www.etsy.com/listing/258037025/on-sale-fab-ladies-straw-trilby-by?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=marshall%20field&ref=sr_gallery_35

FrouFrou4YouYou hats:https://www.etsy.com/listing/203180249/blue-floral-hat-with-green-leaves-and?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=marshall%20field&ref=sr_gallery_38

https://www.etsy.com/listing/190984065/vintage-red-satin-with-rose-cocktail-hat?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=marshall%20field&ref=sr_gallery_27

https://www.etsy.com/listing/258843480/black-feather-headband-with-shimmering?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=marshall%20field&ref=sr_gallery_3

 

Chicago Millinery History: Marshall Field and Co’s Forum of International Fashion February 24, 2016

imageSpring 1946 was the first season post WorldWarII when Amrican women could look forward to fashion without the constraints of rationing and serious shortages of options. Marshall Field and Company was ready and raring to go. Some ingenious planning was bringing seventeen US and international designers to the 28 Shop of the State Street store. The Forum of International Fashion was introduced to the public with a full page advertisement in the Chicago Tribune on April 7, 1946, followed each day with an almost full page ad to announce that day’s designer.

To put things in context, after the Forum ad for each day, several other fashion ads are included. Other retailers were not about to let all the attention and discretionary spending go to Marshall Field and Co.

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The names of some of the famous designers are not very familiar 70 years later. Others have stood the test of time, such as the first designer, Elsa Schiaparelli.

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April 8 Elsa Schiaparelli

Italian designer, working in Paris, known for artistic, out of the box creations, and her legacy of the color Shocking Pink. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elsa_Schiaparelli

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Other ads for April 8:

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April 9 Pauline Trigere
French designer, working in New York, who worked for Hattie Carneige before going solo. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pauline_Trigère

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Others ads for April 9:

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4/10 Alix Gres
French designer, working in Paris, who claimed her greatest accomplishment was finding Rodier jersey. Also known as Madame Gres, tho her name was actually Germaine Emilie Krebs, and known as Alix Barton.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grès

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Other ads for April 10:

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4/11 Nettie Rosenstein
American designer, working in New York, who created the inaugural gown for First Lady Mamie Eisenhower. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nettie_Rosenstein

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Other ads for April 11:

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April 12 Peter Russell
English designer working in London, he was best known for his suits. Sadly a name rarely, if ever, recalled these days.https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Russell_(fashion_designer)

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Other ads  for April 12:

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April 13 Omar Kiam

American designer, working in NY and Hollywood, he was known for movie creations till he left in 1941.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omar_Kiam

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Other April 13  ads:

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April 14 Lucien Lelong
French fashion manufacturer, working in Paris. He worked with designer Pierre Balmain.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucien_Lelong

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Other April 14 ads:

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April 15 Norman Norell
New York designer who worked in costuming, then worked for Hattie Carniege from 1928 until 1941. After a partnership business, he went solo with much success. A vintage dress was worn by First Lady Michele Obama in 2010.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Norell

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Other April 15 ads

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April 16 Pierre Balmain
French designer, who worked in Paris, with several fragrances still worn today. He is known for having recognized the talent of Karl Lagerfeld, now head designer for Chanel, as well as Fendi. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Balmain

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Other April 16 ads:

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April 17 Jo Copeland
American designer, who was well regarded for her After Five designs.
http://marybawa.com/historyofashion/copeland.html

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Other April 17 ads:

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April 18 Anthony Blotta
American designer, known for wool suits and coats.
http://vintagefashionguild.org/label-resource/blotta-anthony/

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Other April 18 ads:

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April 19 Germaine Legroux
Nothing is found online.

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Other ads April 19:

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April 20 Angele Delanghe
Belgian designer working in London, known for soft tailoring.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angele_Delanghe

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Other April 20 ads:

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Marshall Field and Co did not take the day off from the Forum, even tho it is Sunday. Easter Sunday, no less, when many of the finest fashions were worn with pride.

4/21 Adrian, just Adrian. He was one of the most legendary American designers.

American designer, working in Hollywood, known for work in films, the red slippers for Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz, and his own couture house.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrian_(costume_designer)

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Ads and the magazine cover from the paper April 21:

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April 22 Hardy Amies
London designer, SIR Edwin Hardy Aimes, best known as official dressmaker to Queen ElizabethII.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardy_Amies

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One April 22 ad, and a back page spread of what was worn that Easter Sunday:

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April 23 Hattie Carnegie
Viennese designer, working in New York, known for her head to hem concept of dressing women, as she started as a milliner. She recognized the talents of Norman Norell, Pauline Trigere, and James Galanos.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hattie_Carnegie

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Other April 23 ads:

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April 24 Balenciaga
Spanish designer, working in Paris, known for evening wear. Also noted is Balenciaga brown, introduced by Marshall Field and Co in 1938. One rarely hears of it much in this century, unlike the Shocking Pink of Schiaparelli.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balenciaga

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Other April 24 ads:

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And so we end the Forum of International Fashion from Marshall Field and Co.  Chicago certainly did have a moment in the sun for fashion in 1946.

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